Asia Outdoors

Taking Deeper Breaths: Hiking The Himalayas

Taking Deeper Breaths: Hiking The Himalayas

Waking up as early as the sun rises.

Taking deeper breaths. Calming a racing heart.

Silencing irrational thoughts.

Unimportant thoughts in the eye of nature’s vastness.

Hiking through lush forests, rugged landscapes and mountain villages.

Warming up at the open fire, being asleep by 9pm and sleeping as soundly as I did as a young girl.

Early morning ascents to watch the sun come up behind the mountain peaks.

Learning about the world and about myself.

 

Some words on how I feel about our recent trip to Nepal, and more specifically the days we spent hiking through the Himalayas. When my partner proposed to include an 11-day trek through the Himalayas, I told him I’m not a mountain climber (or a ‘fit girl’ for that matter). I couldn’t have been more wrong. Since the Mount Everest was conquered first about 60 years ago, the area has become way more accessible to walkers of all different levels. We decided to do a less discovered trek to escape the crowds and combined the ‘Mardi Himal’ trek with the Khopra range. Being rewarded with stunning views, but at the same time seeing what an incredibly culturally diverse region it is. The people having adapted to an environment which can be as hostile as it is beautiful.

Here are some impressions.

Taking Deeper Breaths: Hiking The Himalayas Taking Deeper Breaths: Hiking The Himalayas Taking Deeper Breaths: Hiking The Himalayas Taking Deeper Breaths: Hiking The Himalayas Taking Deeper Breaths: Hiking The Himalayas Taking Deeper Breaths: Hiking The Himalayas Taking Deeper Breaths: Hiking The HimalayasTaking Deeper Breaths: Hiking The HimalayasTaking Deeper Breaths: Hiking The HimalayasTaking Deeper Breaths: Hiking The HimalayasTaking Deeper Breaths: Hiking The HimalayasTaking Deeper Breaths: Hiking The HimalayasTaking Deeper Breaths: Hiking The HimalayasTaking Deeper Breaths: Hiking The HimalayasTaking Deeper Breaths: Hiking The Himalayas

Good To Know

What is the best time to go?

The best timing is in September and October, with the best views and clearest skies. Yet, the trails can get busy during these periods and March & April are good alternatives.

Where do you sleep?

Along the trek there are so-called ‘tea houses’. Basic stone houses made into rooms with a communal area / restaurant warmed up by an open fire. Basic but cosy! At some places, you can pay extra for a hot shower.

What do you eat?

At the same tea houses along the way. They all have the same menu (with small variations), which was developed by the ministry of tourism. It ranges from fried rice to soups, simple sandwiches and even pizza – all with a Nepali twist.

Do you need a guide?

Although most hikers do have a guide, we met a couple of people along the way trying to master the trek on their own, equipped with an old-school map or an app called Maps.me. I personally would recommend everyone to hire a guide, since there are certain parts of trails where you can get lost or tea houses might be fully booked once you arrive (while guides always book ahead). One night, just after dinner while we were warming up in front of the fire, a couple trekking without a guide arrived completely soaked from the rain and exhausted to a fully booked tea house, ending up sleeping on the ground in the communal area since they hadn’t booked ahead. Something you might want to avoid. J We booked via a company called Budget Trekking and were more than happy!

Images by Pie Arts

You Might Also Like

No Comments

Leave a Reply

Top